Category Archives: Psychology

Breathe

Lately, I’ve started feeling the beginnings of my anxiety and depression acting up. Hadn’t felt this way in several weeks. I still feel down, anxious, and out of sorts right now, but I know it’ll pass. And, eventually, I figure out what triggered it and can prevent a future one from a similar trigger. Anyway, this experience has reminded me of a pin I pinned on Pinterest. I found the sign below a couple of months ago on the internet. It was created by the Lonely Lotus and the words are by Danielle Koepke. I think it has been one of my most popular pins. It’s been repinned more than 500 times. Since I’ve dealt with anxiety for most of my life, Danielle’s words mean a lot to me. However, I didn’t realize how much the words meant to others. Hope you find it meaningful.

I’m planning to post more of my favorite Pinterest pins. Maybe I can make it a monthly or weekly blogging habit. I really do need to get back to blogging here, but life has been very busy with family, school, work, and a knee injury. To see more anxiety related pins you can go to my anxiety Pinterest board by clicking HERE .20140602-165403-60843109.jpg

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V is for Vicarious Learning

show me what to do;
you lead me with your actions —
world, you be care-full…

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“…a vicarious learning event is defined as one in which new responses are acquired or the characteristics of existing response repertoires are modified as a function of observing the behavior or others and its reinforcing consequences, without the modeled responses being overtly performed by the viewer during the exposure period.”
Albert Bandura in his article Vicarious Processes: A Case of No-Trial Learning, 1965, in the journal Advances in Experimental Social Psychology

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Vicarious learning, also known as observational learning, has to do with learning by watching someone else. However, the human mind and behavior are very complexed, and vicarious learning is just one of many ways we learn. Nonetheless, being aware that this type of learning exists can help us understand our actions better and help us modify mistaken actions we have taken.

Below is a video of a famous experiment done by Albert Bandura in the 1960s to study the effects of observation of aggressive behavior on children. Results of the study were that the children exposed to the aggressive behavior of an adult behaved aggressively after watching this adult. The study made Bandura a pioneer in the study of the effects of observed behavior and a model for future research on the topic. Prior to this study, popular thought was that observing aggression and its consequences would some how make someone less aggressive. Dr. Bandura led people to question this assumption and consider the possibility that behavior can be learned and repeated by simply watching. This study is called the Bobo Doll Experiment.

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“Each day of our lives we make deposits in the memory banks of our children.”
-Charles R. Swindoll

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Part of my personal effort, no matter how small or simple, to post more on psychology and/or mental health; and to raise awareness of the mind and decrease stigma of disorders and illnesses related to the mind. Additional posts in this series can be found by clicking on the badge below.

A2Z Psychology2


U is for Unconditional

see me as I am
not as you want me to be–
then, I with you speak…

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According to Wikipedia,

Unconditional Positive Regard, a term popularly believed to have been coined by the humanist Carl Rogers, is basic acceptance and support of a person regardless of what the person says or does.   Rogers believes that unconditional positive regard is essential to healthy development.  People who have not been exposed to it may come to see themselves in the negative ways that others have made them feel.  Through providing unconditional positive regard, humanist therapists seek to help their clients accept and take responsibility for themselves. Humanist psychologists believe that by showing the client unconditional positive regard and acceptance, the therapist is providing the best possible conditions for personal growth to the client.”

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Carl Rogers Quote

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Part of my personal effort, no matter how small or simple, to post more on psychology and/or mental health; and to raise awareness of the mind and decrease stigma of disorders and illnesses related to the mind.  Additional posts in this series can be found by clicking on the badge below.

A2Z Psychology2


T is for Teenhood

“Adolescents are not monsters. They are just people trying to learn how to make it among the adults in the world, who are probably not so sure themselves.”

Virginia Satir

My son is twelve years old. And I fear he’s already showing signs of teenhood. I know that sounds bad, but I still love my little one. It’s just the challenge of physical, emotional, and mental changes that occur during these years is scary and intimating. With this in mind, I’m reading a book called Conversations with the Wise Uncle, by Dennis E. Coates, Ph.D. (http://strongforparentingblog.com/), to prepare for the ups and downs of teenhood.  I am very grateful for finding this book.  It is an easy to read book loaded with useful, practical information for raising a teenage son into a healthy adult.  He has another similar book called Conversations with the Wise Aunt.  I plan to read the second book next.  I have two nieces in elementary school, and I want to be ready for their teenhood.  Below is a graphic I found on the development of the teen brain.  Although the graphic is based on a book by another psychologist, I think it’s a good illustration of the teen brain development Dr. Coates emphasizes in his book.  According to Coates, the pre-frontal area of the brain is initially immature and is under extreme growth and development during the teen years and will continue to develop and mature up into the early twenties.  What the teen is exposed to (physically, mentally, and emotionally) has a great impact on his or her success as an adult.  Coates’s books provide several chapters on how you can help your teenager prepare for teenhood and develop a healthy brain and life through awareness of the changes and challenges involved in the teen years, good habits, wise choices, listening, and critical thinking.

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Produced by Sharing Parenting. 2009 Brochure Design © tamibrown graphic design (01223) 236026. Source: ‘What Every Parent Needs to Know’ by Margot Sunderland

Part of my personal effort, no matter how small or simple, to post more on psychology and/or mental health; and to raise awareness of the mind and decrease stigma of disorders and illnesses related to the mind. Additional posts in this series can be found by clicking on the badge below.

A2Z Psychology2


S is for Stigma and Stereotypes

“Stereotypes do exist, but we have to walk through them.”
-Forest Whitaker

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As the quote says, stereotypes do exist. Social psychologist even write that stereotypes are normal parts of being human and being able to adapt to our world. True, but we must not walk around unaware of the consequences of the stereotypes that we hold. Many of these stereotypes can be unhealthy and harmful. Like not getting help or support for yourself or a loved one for fear of being labeled “crazy”.  Below is a thoughtful and moving five minute video on the making of a public service announcement (PSA), directed by Ron Howard, for an organization named Bring Change to Mind working to erase the stigma of mental illness.

Stigma: a mark of disgrace associated with a particular circumstance, quality, or person.

(source: oxforddictionaries.com)

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Go to Bring Change to Mind for more information on fighting stigma associated with mental illness and to see the completed PSA (Change A Mind About Mental Illness).

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Part of my personal effort, no matter how small or simple, to post more on psychology and/or mental health; and to raise awareness of the mind and decrease stigma of disorders and illnesses related to the mind. Additional posts in this series can be found by clicking on the badge below.

A2Z Psychology2


R is for Relax

“Just as a bicycle-chain may be too tight, so may one’s carefulness and conscientiousness be so tense as to hinder the running of one’s mind.”
William James

I found this fun info-graphic while Googling for ideas for illustrating the importance of finding time to relax in a busy life.  It’s from 2012, but I think it’s still relevant.

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Part of my personal effort, no matter how small or simple, to post more on psychology and/or mental health; and to raise awareness of the mind and decrease stigma of disorders and illnesses related to the mind. Additional posts in this series can be found by clicking on the badge below.

A2Z Psychology2


Q is for Question

For the letter Q, I am trying out a poll by asking you all a question on how you manage your mental health.  When I’m upset, I tend to keep to myself and need time to recover and get my thoughts together.  I’ll read, watch TV, write, browse the internet, or take a nap.  I have often read that when you’re feeling depressed, you should not isolate yourself.  But most of the time, I need that rest time to myself before I reach out.  What do you do?  Go ahead and vote.  I’m curious to read what other bloggers do.  If you’d like, you can leave a comment and share some specifics about what you do to keep sane.  If not, you can stay anonymous and simply vote.  I wasn’t planning to close the poll, so you’re welcome to come back to browse the poll results and comments over time.

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Part of my personal effort, no matter how small or simple, to post more on psychology and/or mental health; and to raise awareness of the mind and decrease stigma of disorders and illnesses related to the mind. Additional posts in this series can be found by clicking on the badge below.

A2Z Psychology2


P is for PTSD

stunned by blinding dark,
mind twitches to recover
worldview distorted…

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20130612-165830.jpgSource: http://visual.ly/what-ptsd-0

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June is PTSD Awareness Month. Click here or below for more information on PTSD:

National Center for PTSD homepage

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Part of my personal effort, no matter how small or simple, to post more on psychology and/or mental health; and to raise awareness of the mind and decrease stigma of disorders and illnesses related to the mind. Additional posts in this series can be found by clicking on the badge below.

A2Z Psychology2


O is for OCD

obsessions trigger
anxiety which triggers
compulsions — repeat

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“Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a disorder of the brain and behavior. OCD causes severe anxiety in those affected. OCD involves both obsessions and compulsions that take a lot of time and get in the way of important activities the person values.”
Source: International OCD Foundation

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Part of my personal effort, no matter how small or simple, to post more on psychology and/or mental health; and to raise awareness of the mind and decrease stigma of disorders and illnesses related to the mind. Additional posts in this series can be found by clicking on the badge below.

A2Z Psychology2


N is for Neurotransmitters

hidden signals in
each being, traveling on
paths unseen — nerve trek…

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Neurotransmitters are substances that transmit messages from one neuron to another through an electrochemical process. Neurons are nerve cells found throughout the human body in our nervous system. The nervous system covers our entire body and allows all areas of the body to communicate with the brain. This communication occurs with the help of the neurotransmitters. There are many neurotransmitters. Imbalances found in some of these neurotransmitters in the brain have been implicated in symptoms found in some mental disorders and states. The info-graphic below shows an example of a few neurotransmitters and how they affect us and some medications or substances that help with regulating imbalances.

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Source: visual.ly

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A2Z Psychology2

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Inspired by

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Source:Mental Health America

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Related articles


Psychology A2Z – Continued

I’ve decided to combine the next two letters of the Psychology A2Z into one post. The reason for this decision is that the subjects I chose for L and M go together. You’ll see.

A2Z Psychology2

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L is for Learned Helplessness

try, fail, try, fail, try…
hope fades wishes disappear–
a habit settles

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“Learned helplessness, in psychology, a mental state in which an organism forced to bear aversive stimuli, or stimuli that are painful or otherwise unpleasant, becomes unable or unwilling to avoid subsequent encounters with those stimuli, even if they are ‘escapable,’ presumably because it has learned that it cannot control the situation…The theory of learned helplessness also has been applied to many conditions and behaviours, including clinical depression, aging, domestic violence, poverty, discrimination, parenting, academic achievement, drug abuse, and alcoholism…”

Encyclopædia Britannica.

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An example of inducing learned helplessness –

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M is for Martin Seligman

found the negative
then went for the positive —
changed a science

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“Success requires persistence, the ability to not give up in the face of failure. I believe that optimistic explanatory style is the key to persistence.”

~ Martin Seligman (One of the founding psychologist of positive psychology)

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“Martin E. P. ‘Marty’ Seligman (born August 12, 1942) is an American psychologist, educator, and author of self-help books. His theory of learned helplessness is popular among scientific and clinical psychologists…Seligman worked with Christopher Peterson to create what they describe as a ‘positive’ counterpart to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). While the DSM focuses on what can go wrong, Character Strengths and Virtues is designed to look at what can go right. In their research they looked across cultures and across millennia to attempt to distill a manageable list of virtues that have been highly valued from ancient China and India, through Greece and Rome, to contemporary Western cultures. Their list includes six character strengths: wisdom/knowledge, courage, humanity, justice, temperance, and transcendence. Each of these has perhaps a half-dozen sub-entries; for instance, temperance includes forgiveness, humility, prudence, and self-regulation.”

Wikipedia

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Positive Psychology Melbourne

Source: Positive Psychology Melbourne (Click on chart for larger chart and more information).

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Inspired by

20130424-103449.jpg

Source:Mental Health America

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Related articles


K is for Kay

bipolar is Kay–

battles her demons becomes

psychologist, yeah

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Source of book cover: http://www.womensbookshop.co.nz

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“But, with time, one has encountered many of the monsters, and one is increasingly less terrified of those still to be met.”

― Kay Redfield Jamison, from An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness

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“Kay Redfield Jamison (born June 22, 1946) is an American clinical psychologist and writer whose work has centered on bipolar disorder which she has suffered from since her early adulthood. She is Professor of Psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and is an Honorary Professor of English at the University of St Andrews.”

-Wikipedia – Click here for more.

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A2Z Psychology2

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Inspired by

20130424-103449.jpg

Source:Mental Health America

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Related articles


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